FOOD FOR THOUGHT

I recently saw a blog post about fertile couples and embryo adoption that was interesting to me. The blogger told about a woman who easily had two genetic children was interested in completing their family through adoption. After investigating domestic infant adoption and realizing how many couples are waiting for babies, they started looking into embryo adoption. The reasoning for EA was because of the commonly used statistic of nearly 500,000 frozen embryos in the United States and they wanted to help. The blogger’s concern was how that while there may be hundreds of thousands of frozen embryos, only a very few of those are actually available for adoption, and that fertile couples just wanting to “help” could be limiting opportunities for those who are unable to conceive on their own.

I have several thoughts on this:

• If it weren’t for a “fertile” couple that later decided to add to their family through embryo adoption because they felt called to honor life at perhaps its most vulnerable state, we might not have Grant and Maria. Because of this couple’s decision, the option of embryo adoption became a very real possibility for us. Previously, I was really only considering international adoption and the process and cost were terrifying and overwhelming to me.

• I think whatever motivates a person to investigate is positive. You just never know where a path might lead. After investigating and they learn that the number of available embryos is much less than the number actually frozen, they might go another direction or they might realize that this really is the way they are meant to complete their family.

• Additionally, as more people learn about embryo adoption it might encourage those with remaining embryos to donate theirs to allow another family to be complete. I know of several people who had remaining embryos who didn’t know this option existed until they found out about how Grant and Maria came to be our children.

• Adoption, no matter the type, shouldn’t be limited to only those who are infertile. While this wasn’t suggested in the blog, it was implied. What is wrong with adopting a child or an embryo even if the initial motivation is to help? At the end of the day, you truly have to want another child or children to go through all the hoops that are involved with adoption.

I don’t know about you, but I get excited anytime I hear about any couple adopting, whether they have genetic children or not. Adoption takes a lot of courage and commitment. Adoption is a gift and shouldn’t be limited.

Advertisements

One thought on “FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s