NEVER A DULL MOMENT

The last hour and a half of our Sunday makes me laugh.  It had been a relatively normal day until after naps.  One of our cats has a bladder infection and I discovered several spots in the den where she had been peeing rather than using the litter box.  The kids were occupied in the living room throwing a party for their animals, which consisted of getting out all the pillows and blankets and spreading across the room.  They were appropriately noisy so I didn’t keep that close of a watch on them as I cleaned soiled carpet and shoved medicine down the cat’s throat with a syringe.  Jeremy was occupied with laundry so he wasn’t watching closely either, so we can’t say for certain what happened.  All I know is that I heard Grant say his arm hurt and he was holding it as if it were in a sling close to his body.  Now, they do a lot of pretend play, so I wasn’t sure if he was really hurt or just playing, until I got close to him and his eyes said that he was actually hurt.  I called for Jeremy and said I think he might have nursemaid’s elbow again.  Mentally, I was recalling when this happened two years ago and how the ER doctor showed me how to fix it if and when it happened again as this is not an uncommon injury for children this age because they have loose ligaments.  I really didn’t want to make a trip to the immediate care center or ER!

Jeremy and I tried to touch his arm, but he protested.  After a little coaxing, I talked him into letting me touch his arm.  I then quickly completed the maneuver as demonstrated by the doctor when I felt and heard his elbow pop.  It brought forth a quick cry from Grant, but as soon as it started, he stopped.  Within minutes, he was moving his arm normally again.  For that I was relieved.

A few minutes later, Grant stuck his finger in the sensor of the carbon monoxide detector and it proceeded to go off for the next several minutes.  Jeremy was finally able to reset it and we could try to recover the hearing that was lost. A little while later, after approximately 87 trips to the bathroom, the kids were quiet and I could laugh at the comedy of errors that had occurred that evening. The last hour and a half of our Sunday makes me laugh. It had been a relatively normal day until after naps. One of our cats has a bladder infection and I discovered several spots in the den where she had been peeing rather than using the litter box. The kids were occupied in the living room throwing a party for their animals, which consisted of getting out all the pillows and blankets and spreading across the room. They were appropriately noisy so I didn’t keep that close of a watch on them as I cleaned soiled carpet and shoved medicine down the cat’s throat with a syringe. Jeremy was occupied with laundry so he wasn’t watching closely either, so we can’t say for certain what happened. All I know is that I heard Grant say his arm hurt and he was holding it as if it were in a sling close to his body. Now, they do a lot of pretend play, so I wasn’t sure if he was really hurt or just playing, until I got close to him and his eyes said that he was actually hurt. I called for Jeremy and said I think he might have nursemaid’s elbow again. Mentally, I was recalling when this happened two years ago and how the ER doctor showed me how to fix it if and when it happened again as this is not an uncommon injury for children this age because they have loose ligaments. I really didn’t want to make a trip to the immediate care center or ER!

Jeremy and I tried to touch his arm, but he protested. After a little coaxing, I talked him into letting me touch his arm. I then quickly completed the maneuver as demonstrated by the doctor when I felt and heard his elbow pop. It brought forth a quick cry from Grant, but as soon as it started, he stopped.Within minutes, he was moving his arm normally again. For that I was relieved.

A few minutes later, Grant stuck his finger in the sensor of the carbon monoxide detector and it proceeded to go off for the next several minutes. Jeremy was finally able to reset it and we could try to recover the hearing that was lost.

A little while later, after approximately 87 trips to the bathroom, the kids were quiet and I could laugh at the comedy of errors that had occurred that evening.

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